Sniffing Cadaver Dogs Intensify the Mystery of Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance

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amelia earhart documentary
image source: atlasobscura.com

The mystery of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance is getting complicated with time. After Amelia Earhart’s disappearance in a missing plane, on 2 July 1937, there have been a number of theories circulating around. We have shared a great part of it earlier. But the latest Amelia Earhart documentary is stating an all new theory. Believing this one rejects all previous claims of Amelia and her navigator Fred Noonan capture by the Japanese folks.

Last week an alleged vintage photograph of Amelia and Noonan surfaced. It empowered the previous claims that Amelia was captured by Japanese and died in their prison. All these claims have been rejected by Japanese official. They have no record of capturing any female flyer or her navigator ever. According to an expert, that photo was just of a ‘group on the dock appears to be out for a Sunday stroll, or awaiting someone’s arrival from one of the ships in the harbor,’

[Read here: Amelia Earhart Found or Not?]

Emily Earhart as a Castaway!

The latest research proves Amelia to have died on a desolated Gardner island as a castaway. The research was conducted by researchers at the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery. It was funded by National Geographic.

It involved four fully trained border cadaver dogs (Marcy, Piper, Kayle and Berkeley) to find any trace of human remains or chemicals from decaying body on the island of Nikumaroro or Gardner Island. All four dogs sniffed and pointed out the same spot where British official found 13 human bones back in 1940. The bones were concluded to belong to Amelia Earhart.

The recent report writes; “Within moments of beginning to work the site, Berkeley, a curly red male, lay down at the base of a ren tree, eyes locked on his handler,” said Lynne Angeloro.

[Read here: Sally Hemings Quarter Found in Monticello Mansion]

“The signals were clear: Someone – perhaps Earhart or her navigator, Fred Noonan – had died beneath the ren tree.”

No remains have been found there but soil samples have been collected from the exact spot where dogs sniffed. Will keep our readers updated of what conclusion comes after examining of the samples.